Economic & Environmental Sustainability

Mayor Satya Rhodes-Conway Is Far Behind in Meeting Madison’s Climate Change Carbon Reduction Goal by 2030 & 2050

The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE)  ranked Madison 64th out of 100 cities behind Cities of Milwaukee, Chicago, Minneapolis and St. Paul MN., in its annual “clean energy scorecard.”

Over the past decade, Madison invested over $95 million in making local government operations carbon neutral by 2030. 

ACEEE cited our elected officials with  a lack of “building standards and a lack of community-wide initiatives and transportation policies.”  

ACEEE went on to say, “even though the city adopted a sustainability plan over ten years ago Madison will not meet either the 2030 or 2050 sustainability goals.”

This is Inexcusable! “What Gets Measured Gets Done”

Now more than ever our city elected officials and city department heads must establish measurable and quantifiable sustainability goals with key performance indicators.”

Simply put, “what gets measured gets done.”  Therefore City Department heads need to regularly monitor and report monthly their progress in achieving the city’s sustainability goals, to the Mayor and to the City Council. In turn, our elected officials must hold city agencies responsible for achieving carbon reduction goals by 2030 and 2050.

Over the past decade, Madison invested $95 million in making local government operations carbon neutral by 2030. However, The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE)  ranked Madison 64th out of 100 cities, behind Milwaukee, Chicago, Minneapolis and St. Paul, in its annual “clean energy scorecard.” In other words, we have failed in our goals.

ACEEE cited our elected officials with  a lack of “building standards and a lack of community-wide initiatives and transportation policies.”  ACEEE went on to say, “even though the city adopted a sustainability plan over ten years ago Madison will not meet either the 2030 or 2050 sustainability goals.”

Sustainability Policy & Development 101:

Sustainability policy is a renewable and sustainable strategy for economic development, which meets the human, economic and smart-growth needs of our communities and nation – while protecting and preserving the environment and mitigating the human-threat of Climate Change.

Sustainability is also about social and economic justice and assuring all American citizens have equal opportunities to educate their children, keep them healthy and advance their families economically – while reducing poverty, food insecurities and eliminating racial disparities.

– Nino Amato – University of Wisconsin Adjunct Professor of “Sustainability Policy & Practices” & Former Senior Vice President of Wisconsin Power & Light Company & President of  WPL Foundation, Inc

The Shape of Things to Come – 21st Century Renewable Energy Jobs & a Growing Sustainable Economy

The fossil fuel industry has created a false narrative, that people must choose between keeping fossil fuel jobs or run the risk of massive job loss in the U.S. 

What the coal, oil, public electric utilities, fracking and coal tar-industries, don’t want us to know is that, the renewable energy industry is leading the world in new job development and growth. 

Contrary to those who are “Climate Change Denier,” who have said; “Climate Change is a hoax invented by the Chinese,” is blatantly false.

Renewable Energy Investment & Deployment Is Paying Off

In 2020, the Renewable Energy Industry world-wide, created over 11.1 million new high paying green energy jobs, according to the International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA).
  • The solar PV industry retains the top spot, with a third of the total renewable energy workforce. In 2018, PV employment expanded in India, Southeast Asia and Brazil, while China, the United States, Japan and the European Union lost jobs.
  • Rising output pushed biofuel jobs up 6% to 2.1 million. Brazil, Colombia, and Southeast Asia have labor-intensive supply chains where informal work is prominent, whereas operations in the United States and the European Union are far more mechanized.
  • Employment in wind power supports 1.2 million jobs. Onshore projects predominate, but the offshore segment is gaining traction and could build on expertise and infrastructure in the offshore oil and gas sector.
  • Hydropower has the largest installed capacity of all renewables but is now expanding slowly. The sector employs 2.1 million people directly, three quarters of who are in operations and maintenance.
IRENA has now validated the faster growing jobs industry world-wide and in the U.S., is in the renewable energy industry, which has become an essential job creator and driver in the transformation of our nation and the world economies.